Kingswood is Back, Hoping for Rezoning and Community Support

An artist's rendering of the Scott Crescent development, previously called Red Point. On the right is the National Climbing Centre, a 5,000 square feet facility for climbing, and for use by non-profits in Squamish

An artist’s rendering of the Scott Crescent development. The developer plans to appear before council soon for rezoning to the property that will see 300-400 residential units at the town entrance.

By Gagandeep Ghuman
Published: March. 23, 2013

It’s been rejected and delayed, but Kingswood is back again, hoping for community and council approval for their Scott Crescent development.

One of the most hotly debated development proposals will appear before council for rezoning soon, most probably this month.

The formerly Red Point development plans a comeback on Scott Crescent with anywhere from 300-400 condos and townhomes.

The size of the units is yet to be determined, but expect anything from a one-bedroom to three-bedroom units.

“We will react to the market,” said John Moonen, the Kingswood spokesperson. 

Kingswood has been trying to get the development off the ground for more than six years now.

In 2008, the Red Point development failed to get third reading, and two years later, an application to build a RV park was shelved.

Kingswood’s application to rezone the 8.3 acre property from Tourist-Commercial to Residential was put on hold by the district in 2011, as the district completed its Upper Mamquam Blind Channel study.

The developer comes to the community with a bag full of amenities, from waterfront walkways to trails, and community meeting room.

“It’s close to $1 million in amenities,” Moonen said, sharing the details in a Squamish Trails Society meeting on March. 22.

Some of the community amenities include:

Rebuilding Stairs on the Hunter Trail ($50,000)

 Bridge to Rose Park to Spit ($100,000)

  A 1,500 square-foot community meeting room: ($375,000)

 Public art gateway ($50,000)

 A new canoe/kayak launch on the channel, along with improvements to both Toboggan Trail and Pipeline Trail can also be expected.

 The developer will also contribute towards the creation of two left-hand and a right hand turn from Clark Drive on to Highway 99.

Waterfront walkway and Park is another contribution the developer is willing to make.

This walkway would stretch from the intersection of Highway 99 and Scott, all along into what is Scott Crescent, into Owen Carney’s place and further into the DeCook property, right up to municipal property.

Such generous amenities might fail to impress Clark Drive residents, who fear their narrow and relatively quiet road will be bottlenecked with traffic.

“It is interesting to me to see that there is little to no will to look at anything except Clarke Drive,” said area resident Chris Atkinson.

He said one of the best alternatives besides Clarke would be Behrner Drive, past the hospital and down the old road grade ending at the Blind Channel.

That rerouting option, however, was considered too expensive by the developer.

Kingswood spokesperson Moonen said there are plans to improve existing Highway 99 and Scott Crescent intersection with the addition of a deceleration lane coming north and a right turn lane to exit from Scott.

Scott Crescent will be reconstructed as a two way local road with a paved surface, curb and gutter, pedestrian bulges, raised pedestrian crossings and curbside street parking.

A turnaround area will be provided for trucks and cars to reduce the volume of traffic using Clarke Drive. 

The section of Scott Crescent ascending the hill will have grade separated travel lanes and a walkway/bikeway, he added.

 

Comments

  1. SHIRLEY TOMAN says:

    I THINK THAT THE RAPE OF OUR LAND HAS GONE FAR ENOUGH THANK YOU. WE HAVE BEARS COMEING TO OUR FRONT DOORS FOR FOOD, GEESE LOOKING AT OUR OUT BUILDINGS TO NEST ,THE WILD LIFE HAVE TO DEAL WITH THE INTORUPTIPN, AS WE DO ON OUR NATIVE LAND , HOW MUCH DISTRUCTION HAS TO HAPPEN BEFOR IT STOPS, and my spelling is due to the fact that RESEDENTLE SCHOOLS WANTED ME ON MY KNEES NOT SITTING AND LEARNING.

  2. Jason Bechard says:

    Why hasn’t anyone suggested to the Kingswood on Scott Crescent development that they make a road around the pond existing by the logging company on Loggers Lane just past the slough. They could make the section closest to the water a walking/bike lane and make Scott Crescent a one way. Entrance off 99 and exit to loggers lane.

    Would solve the road issue, make a nice walking area around the pond for the locals and actually connect the walk path from beside 99 across from Shell to the walking path down Loggers Lane.

    Or would this all make too much sense??

  3. Eric Andersen says:

    Constructive suggestion, Jason. The problem with the route you suggest – the old shoreline log truck road between Loggers Lane and Scott Crescent – is that it traverses three blocks of privately owned land (with two owners). There is another road access option to be explored – the upper section of the same old logging road, from the top of Behrner Drive to the shoreline at the north end of the Kingswood development proposal site, a right of way which is now owned by the District.

    We are quite a ways from a clear road map (and trail map) to accommodate this development as proposed – if it can be accommodated as proposed. The neighbourhoods of Valleycliffe and Hospital Hill have road and trail issues to be resolved quite aside from those arising from this Scott Crescent development proposal. We need the District of Squamish as an active partner in finding solutions.

    • Jason Bechard says:

      Thank You for the information Eric. I knew was some issue but it wasn’t 100% clear to me.

      The issue is the DOS as of lately has taken the “hands off’ approach to planning of anything.