MP John Weston Unimpressed With West Vancouver Council’s Stance on Woodfibre LNG

By Gagandeep Ghuman
Published: Aug 6, 2014

MP John Weston says he has never previosuly written anything to publicly challenge the decisions of the West Vancouver council.

But now he is breaking from the past in a a latest press release sent to the media.  

“I disagree with the motion, the way it has been passed, and its timing.” MP John Weston.

Weston has expressed his disapproval of the recent motion passed by West Vancouver council to ban the passage of LNG tankers in the Howe Sound. 

Weston said he disagreed with the motion that was unanimously passed by the West Vancouver council on July 31.

“I disagree with the motion, the way it has been passed, and its timing,” he said.

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“Elected officials  have a duty to wait until they know what the concerns are, how significant they may be, and what can be done to mitigate them. At this time, we have not heard of the Council investigating the matter thoroughly or interviewing the proponent, Woodfibre LNG in Squamish.”

Weston said the proponent is doing a lot to engage the public in Squamish. He said the community needs to know more about the project, which hasn’t even entered its environmental assesement phase yet.

“LNG promises to bring jobs and economic growth across our whole province.” MP Weston

“It’s one thing to say, “No, not in my backyard.”  However, it’s something else to say, “No, not in someone else’s backyard.” 

“LNG promises to bring jobs and economic growth across our whole province.  The Premier and Government of BC have committed to LNG as a primary economic driver.  If we are to pay for our teachers, our medical services, or welfare and the other good things we love in British Columbia, we do need some level of economic growth.”

Sea_to_Sky_Business_Park-450x55-May2014

Weston said before the project can be considered unsound on the basis of environmental safety, community members needs to understand the facts and weign the input of experts.

“I do know that an LNG plant brings an alternative to coal, and brings more high valued long-term jobs to our riding than a gravel pit, a logging project, or a garbage incinerator.”

He said that we should not prejudge this project but remain engaged in the process.  This and other industrial projects should be evaluated one by one, based on facts and science, not presumptions, he added.

 

Comments

  1. Evan Drygas says:

    The district of West Vancouver acted irresponsibly by not only wading into an issue that is entirely out of their jurisdiction, but by making a motion even before the facts where considered. I’m glad to see that Mr. Weston has enough common sense to weigh the facts and stand up for Squamish.

    • Dave Clou says:

      Yes, shame on them for taking a stand against shipping explosive gas past their community. How dare they endanger all those LNG foreign worker jobs.

    • Amanda Andrew says:

      “Stand up for Squamish”??? I, as a resident of Squamish, would hardly call that standing up for Squamish. Mr. Weston does not live in Squamish, and therefore will not see the damage done by this project.

    • Cheryl Cameron says:

      Shame on you John Weston for accusing West Van Council, upon listening to concerned local citizens – citizens who have poured literally thousands of hours of their own time into a thorough and ongoing review of this project, AND of the proposed expansion of LNG in this province, AS WELL AS the LNG industry world-wide, ALONG WITH all of its upstream and downstream effects – of not doing their duty to “wait until they know what the concerns are.” I suggest that Mr. Weston, who refers to LNG as an alternative to coal, should himself “wait” no longer to discover the truth about this energy alternative, in terms of increased fracking in our North country, with the accompanying methane emissions, contamination of groundwater, and rampant waste of fresh water it entails.

    • Delena Angrignon says:

      John Weston is suffering a short term memory loss. It was his Government that opposed LNG tankers in Canadian waters. See below
      Sept. 26, 2006: PM Stephen Harper addressing the House. Mr. Speaker, we have defended [the above] position for a long time. We oppose the passage of LNG tanker traffic through [Canadian waters] and we will continue to do so. (141 Hansard 53, 39th Parl. , 1st session)
      Feb 14, 2007: LNG tanker Policy : “passage of LNG tankers through the environmentally-sensitive and navigationally-challenging marine and coastal areas of sovereign Canadian waters … would present risks to the region … and its inhabitants that the Government of Canada cannot accept”. (Letter from Michael Wilson, Canadian Ambassador, to the U.S. Government)

      • M L Stathers says:

        Yes, Delena … I wonder how the whole issue – in the FIRST PLACE – got past the SIGTTO Regulations for siteing LNG installations – given the geography of our fjord, & not to forget the crowded Gulf Islands. The whole list of regulations can be seen online – they are numbered & easy to read.

    • M L Stathers says:

      remind Evan Drygas that Horseshoe Bay is part of West Vancouver (notice the ‘entering West Vancouver…” sign well north of the Bay on Hwy. 99). The proposed LNG tanker route is through the channel of the BC Ferries route. … a collision would be a wonderful fire-show a la Lac Megantic!

      • Suzanne says:

        Perhaps this was the real reason behind the “suggestion” of closing down the horseshoe bay ferry…did anyone hear about that? no horseshoe bay ferry, one less obstacle in the way of tankers moving through our neighbourhoods! Just a theory, but I wouldn’t put it past Christy Clarke’s government.

  2. Jean says:

    Passage of LNG tankers in the Howe Sound……..Thank,s West Vancouver you to are effected so it is not in your official back yard, it is not in somebody else’s backyard, it will effect you too.

    Elected officials have a duty to wait until they know what the concerns are……..How long??? Until the dictatorial government just brings in the caterpillars and other heavy equipment… actually I am not even sure, wedder “Mud Bay” that night when they shipped over from Squamish harbour to Woodfiber there heavy drill rigs, is not already working on the Job

    “LNG promises to bring jobs and economic growth across our whole province…… for what kind of suffering and irreversible damage done, pollution and safety, danger and subsidies by the taxpayer on Hydro rates etc… for a few high tech Jobs after the install is finished.

    High valued long-term jobs……..only in the Government employment available this days!!!

    This and other industrial projects should be evaluated one by one, based on facts……..the Public has evaluated it, where are, or where were all the elected officials at the time, when the public started to study the proposal and why spend more money studying it, if the basic stinks no perfume will hide the smell.
    Lets hear from the Liberals, so we can make up our mind who to vote for this fall.

  3. Elijah Dann says:

    Big surprise Conservative MP John Weston is unimpressed. But I agree with him on one point. We can wait to find out more about Woodfibre LNG. Because the more we look into it, the dirtier it gets, with the dots between politicians and corporate owners becoming better connected.

    Example?

    Byng Giraud is the Woodfibre LNG Vice-President. But guess who he used to work for? Does the company who owns the Mount Polley mine ring a bell: Imperial Mines?
    http://www.canadalngexport.com/speaker/byng-giraud/

    That’s right, the mining company that just poisoned “Quesnel Lake, Polley Lake, Hazeltine Creek and Cariboo Creek, the entire Quesnel and Cariboo river systems right up to the salmon-bearing Fraser River.”
    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/mount-polley-mine-tailings-pond-breach-called-environmental-disaster-1.2727171

    What a great track record and now it’s on to Squamish and Owen Sound. And of course Mr. Weston now gives a shout-out to him. Does it also surprise you Mr. Giraud has close connections to Harper’s Conservative government? How close?

    From the bio above: “Byng has extensive political experience at the national, provincial and municipal level, serving in senior advisory roles to provincial MLAs, federal MPs, Senators and with BC Ministers. He has managed or participated in over twenty federal, provincial and local elections across Canada. He has served as a director and Vice-President, Western Canada on the governing council of the Conservative Party of Canada with Prime Minister Stephen Harper.”

    That’s right Mr. Weston. Let’s just wait and see what other interesting facts come up over the next few months. Because the more the people of BC and Squamish know about Premier Clark’s LNG aspirations, the more foul it looks.

    • Rob says:

      Two thumbs up! Love it when people do some homework and get to the bottom of issues. Thanks for posting!

    • Andy says:

      Scumbag… I guess Weston is tired of politics, this will surely insure he doesn’t get re-elected. As for Christy…she’s an even bigger sellout! She has no future as a result of LNG and her hanging us out to dry on the Enbridge decision. Industry isn’t where you get your votes… you get them from us. Listen up or get out!

    • Adam says:

      Great post Elijah. Anyone that thinks John Weston cares about Squmaish is high. Suggesting West Vancouver has acted irresponsibly is comical. Does he know the LNG tankers transit through West Vancouver? Do they have no right to express concern over this and to highlight the importance of their involvement in the Environmental Review Process?

      That said, he’s one of Harper’s Toadies.

  4. Paul Watt says:

    The facts are in. LNG is bad for taxpayers, the environment, and our coastal communities. There are huge subsidies being given to these projects. Taxpayers are paying for every dime of these projects with tax credits, then BC Hydro customers pay for their power subsidies. Site C construction, paid for by us, flooding our farmland, will power these projects. The water of the north will be poisoned. Our air in the Sea to Sky will be worsened by NOx and SO2. We risk pipeline or shipping disasters. We will drive out sound sensitive species from Howe Sound. We’ll drive out better industries from Squamish. All for a few jobs mostly for Albertans and Chinese. Where are the positives, John Weston?

  5. elements says:

    It sure as heck will affect West Van when something happens. Thank goodness some elected officials have the balls to to take a stand against our provincial and federal dictators. I’ll bet the communities downstream of Lake Polley are wishing their ancestors weren’t blinded by all the promises of jobs and prosperity. It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that our governments don’t do a very good job of managing environmental risks in traditional resource industries; why should we be expected to blindly believe they’ll do any better with new industries?

  6. Tammy Nicholls says:

    We, the residents of Squamish thank you for standing with us West Vancouver. Most of us imagined that you would be in a hurry to throw us under the proverbial bus, but that doesn’t seem to be happening. Not in our back yard either!

  7. Paul Johnston says:

    It certainly sounds as if Weston has prejudged the project and his opinion does not jive with that of the locals. This is not surprising as Weston makes little effort to learn local views. Over here on the Coast, we find out Weston has come, met with a few select people and gone only when there’s a photo in the paper. This is usually not accompanied by any meaningful information. In his entire time in office, there has been a single public meeting. John did not like the questions, so he disappeared.

  8. Stéphane says:

    “Not knowing the facts” was months ago, when the project was first proposed and people in Squamish were generally open minded to the idea. Now that we have heard facts from experts and the proponents, many of us see more problems then benefits to the Woodfibre LNG proposal and would prefer another approach to economic and social prosperity for our corridor.

    What I am hearing Mr. Weston say here is “when you will support this project, thats when I will know you have all the facts”.

  9. larry mclennan says:

    Right on John ! A Council passes a motion based on what Eoin Finn says with no allowance for the proponents to present their case??? Mr. Weston, in my view, is absolutely correct in his disapproval of the manner in which West Van council passed such a motion . What would the anti-LNG group’s reaction if West Van council had made the opposite motion (pro-LNG) without hearing any of the anti-group’s positions? I have an impression that the reaction (by the anti-group ) would be sulfurous. You’re either for fairness in having all voices heard or against the concept. West Van council should be ashamed for not hearing both sides before making a decision.
    I suggest that the anti-LNG folks review the presentation (some of these “facts” included statements that Howe Sound would become a “marine desert “, the water used for cooling “..will be put back into the sound at 10 degrees warmer than it came in…” and that “…17,000 metric tonnes of chlorinated, desalinated water from gas-cooling (will be) poured back into the marine environment on an hourly basis”. I have looked into these and other assertions made by Mr. Finn and , presumably ,the associations he perports to represent (My Sea to Sky and The Future of Howe Sound Society) and found them to contain grossly exaggerated and misleading assertions. I would suggest that the anti-LNG folks do their own due diligence by sending specific questions regarding their concerns to Woodfibre LNG or by researching other information sources (there’s a lot on the internet). I would also invite all people interested (pro & con) to provide “facts” concerning them on line and then have a discussion to clarify these conceptions.

    • Eoin Finn says:

      FYI: The information that “…17,000 metric tonnes of chlorinated, desalinated water from gas-cooling (will be) poured back into the marine environment on an hourly basis” came from Woodfibre LNG’s own Project Manager and technical expert (Alex Brigden) at an open house meeting at Furry Creek on June 17th. Woodfibre’s VP Byng Giraud and President Tony Gelotti were present and did not refute the statement.

      • Sean Lumb says:

        I am Ph.D. Chemist and a resident of Squamish. I want to correct the misinformation being propagated in Larry McClennan’s post. It was I who spoke with Alex Brigden at the June 17th Open House, and I have since had an extended conversation with Woodfibre LNG via their Facebook site in relation to the cooling system. LNG has been very forthcoming with responses to my questions.

        Eoin is correct: Woodfibre LNG has indicated that it will require 17,000 metric tonnes of cooling water from Howe Sound each hour of operation to extract the heat from the natural gas liquefaction process. The cooling system is a once-through indirect system, which means seawater is sucked up and passed through a heat exchanger to extract the heat from a closed cooling loop connected to the liquefaction train. The heated water is then pumped back into Howe Sound. These facts have been provided by Woodfibre, Larry. This equates to 20 Brennan Park swimming pools’ worth of seawater each hour, or over 175,000 Brennan Park swimming pools’ worth of seawater each year. Brennan Park is Squamish’s local recreation centre and swimming pool.

        Woodfibre has also confirmed that the outfall temperature of the seawater returned to the ocean will be 10 Celsius higher than the ambient seawater temperature. Of course it has to be warmer: the heat from the liquefaction process has to go somewhere! That’s the whole point of once-through indirect cooling system. Environmental regulations require that the temperature be no greater than 1 Celsius 100 metres from the outfall. This requirement says nothing of the temperature within the vicinity of the outfall, nor what happens to the micro- and macro fauna within that 100m radius. Often eutrophication occurs with rises in seawater temperature, during which microfauna blooms exhaust the oxygen supply in the water, effectively killing the life-supporting water column. Effective temperature dissipation depends on a number of factors including convection, tidal churn and others. It’s not publicly clear that Woodfibre LNG will be able to meet the 1C temperature requirement 100m from the outfall, and it’s not publicly clear that they have assessed the thermodynamics of the heated water plume that will result from the cooling system outfall. If it is indeed clear and understood by Woodfibre LNG, then they should make the information publicly available to assuage the public’s concerns for the environmental effects of the heated outfall water.

        Woodfibre LNG has also confirmed that the seawater will be chlorinated as it is sucked up into the cooling system, to inhibit marine growth within the cooling system. This is often done electrochemically by using electricity to convert the natural salt (NaCl) in the seawater into sodium hypochlorite (NaClO, otherwise known as bleach). The use of this particular electrochemical generation technique has NOT been confirmed by Woodfibre LNG. Other chlorination options include injecting chlorine gas into the cooling water, but this involves the handling of dangerous chlorine gas. Hypochlorite is the same biocide that is used in municipal drinking water and swimming pools. Typical biocidal levels are 3-5 ppm total residual chlorine, and Woodfibre has confirmed they will be using this level of chlorine in their cooling system. Seawater cooling systems often use a pulsed chlorination technique to inhibit biofouling: this involves a timed periodic burst of chlorine over regular frequent intervals to prevent the growth of fouling marine organisms (e.g. molluscs and oysters). The use of this particular pulse technique at Woodfibre has not been confirmed by Woodfibre LNG.

        All emitters of total residual chlorine, which include municipalities and private companies or utilities, are required in BC to reduce residual chlorine emissions to below 0.5 ppm. This must be achieved chemically in some way: there to make the Cl- ion just ‘disappear’. The sodium hypochlorite is often turned into something else that is not hypochlorite but still contains a chlorine ion: usually with the addition of yet another chemical: sulfite, thiosulfite, or a number of other well-known “chlorite scrubbing agents’. The products of this chemistry are emitted into the ocean with the outfall. If you have 5ppm chlorite as a biocide, and reduce it to 0.5ppm with a scrubber, then you still have 4.5ppm of the scrubbing product containing chloride being emitted in every 17,000 tonnes of heated chlorinated seawater, every hour. What is the effect of this?

        Further complicating the situation, hypochlorite in seawater rapidly reacts with natural bromide (Br-) in seawater to form hypobromite, and both of these chemical species react with dissolved organic compounds in seawater to form organic chlorides and organic bromides that are toxic to varying degrees to marine and land-based life. This is well-documented chemistry.

        In addition to heat and chlorination, seawater in cooling systems is also often treated with other chemical agents designed to prevent chemical corrosion (as distinct from biofouling) and to condition the seawater. I have no information from Woodfibre LNG on these other conditioning agents.

        One can’t look at existing, open-ocean based LNG facilities and say “well everything seems to work fine for them”. Howe Sound is not the open ocean. Wind and ocean currents, and tidal patterns are different.

        Larry, these are not grossly over-exaggerated assertions but rather facts confirmed by Woodfibre LNG, followed by research into the chemistry of these processes and aided by a little high school maths. I suggest you look at Woodfibre’s Facebook page for my conversation thread on this topic if you concerned with the veracity of these facts.

        • Adam says:

          Thank you Sean and Eoin for posting FACTUAL DATA vs. the uninformed opinions of project proponents like Larry.

          To Larry, saying something is ‘exaggerated’ isn’t sufficient. Show me the FACTS? How much heated/chlorinated water is going to be outputted into Howe Sound. Number and sources please!

      • Sean Lumb says:

        I am Ph.D. Chemist and a resident of Squamish. I want to correct the misinformation being propagated in Larry McClennan’s post. It was I who spoke with Alex Brigden at the June 17th Open House, and I have since had an extended conversation with Woodfibre LNG via their Facebook site in relation to the cooling system. LNG has been very forthcoming with responses to my questions.

        Eoin is correct: Woodfibre LNG has indicated that it will require 17,000 metric tonnes of cooling water from Howe Sound each hour of operation to extract the heat from the natural gas liquefaction process. The cooling system is a once-through indirect system, which means seawater is sucked up and passed through a heat exchanger to extract the heat from a closed cooling loop connected to the liquefaction train. The heated water is then pumped back into Howe Sound. These facts have been provided by Woodfibre, Larry. This equates to 20 Brennan Park swimming pools’ worth of seawater each hour, or over 175,000 Brennan Park swimming pools’ worth of seawater each year. Brennan Park is Squamish’s local recreation centre and swimming pool.

        Woodfibre has also confirmed that the outfall temperature of the seawater returned to the ocean will be 10 Celsius higher than the ambient seawater temperature. Of course it has to be warmer: the heat from the liquefaction process has to go somewhere! That’s the whole point of once-through indirect cooling system. Environmental regulations require that the temperature be no greater than 1 Celsius 100 metres from the outfall. This requirement says nothing of the temperature within the vicinity of the outfall, nor what happens to the micro- and macro fauna within that 100m radius. Often eutrophication occurs with rises in seawater temperature, during which microfauna blooms exhaust the oxygen supply in the water, effectively killing the life-supporting water column. Effective temperature dissipation depends on a number of factors including convection, tidal churn and others. It’s not publicly clear that Woodfibre LNG will be able to meet the 1C temperature requirement 100m from the outfall, and it’s not publicly clear that they have assessed the thermodynamics of the heated water plume that will result from the cooling system outfall. If it is indeed clear and understood by Woodfibre LNG, then they should make the information publicly available to assuage the public’s concerns for the environmental effects of the heated outfall water.

        Woodfibre LNG has also confirmed that the seawater will be chlorinated as it is sucked up into the cooling system, to inhibit marine growth within the cooling system. This is often done electrochemically by using electricity to convert the natural salt (NaCl) in the seawater into sodium hypochlorite (NaClO, otherwise known as bleach). The use of this particular electrochemical generation technique has NOT been confirmed by Woodfibre LNG. Other chlorination options include injecting chlorine gas into the cooling water, but this involves the handling of dangerous chlorine gas. Hypochlorite is the same biocide that is used in municipal drinking water and swimming pools. Typical biocidal levels are 3-5 ppm total residual chlorine, and Woodfibre has confirmed they will be using this level of chlorine in their cooling system. Seawater cooling systems often use a pulsed chlorination technique to inhibit biofouling: this involves a timed periodic burst of chlorine over regular frequent intervals to prevent the growth of fouling marine organisms (e.g. molluscs and oysters). The use of this particular pulse technique at Woodfibre has not been confirmed by Woodfibre LNG.

        All emitters of total residual chlorine, which include municipalities and private companies or utilities, are required in BC to reduce residual chlorine emissions to below 0.5 ppm. This must be achieved chemically in some way: there to make the Cl- ion just ‘disappear’. The sodium hypochlorite is often turned into something else that is not hypochlorite but still contains a chlorine ion: usually with the addition of yet another chemical: sulfite, thiosulfite, or a number of other well-known “chlorite scrubbing agents’. The products of this chemistry are emitted into the ocean with the outfall. If you have 5ppm chlorite as a biocide, and reduce it to 0.5ppm with a scrubber, then you still have 4.5ppm of the scrubbing product, containing the scrubbed chloride, being emitted in every 17,000 tonnes of heated chlorinated seawater, every hour. What is the effect of this?

        Further complicating the situation, hypochlorite in seawater rapidly reacts with natural bromide (Br-) in seawater to form hypobromite (BrO-), and both of these chemical species react with dissolved organic compounds in seawater to form organic chlorides and organic bromides that are toxic to varying degrees to marine and land-based life. This is well-documented chemistry.

        In addition to heat and chlorination, seawater in cooling systems is also often treated with other chemical agents designed to prevent chemical corrosion (as distinct from biofouling) and to condition the seawater. I have no information from Woodfibre LNG on these other conditioning agents.

        One can’t look at existing, open-ocean based LNG facilities and say “well everything seems to work fine for them”. Howe Sound is not the open ocean. Wind and ocean currents, and tidal patterns are different.

        Larry, these are not grossly over-exaggerated assertions but rather facts confirmed by Woodfibre LNG, followed by research into the chemistry of these processes and aided by a little high school maths. I suggest you look at Woodfibre’s Facebook page for my conversation thread on this topic if you concerned with the veracity of these facts.

        • Sean Lumb says:

          Apologies, there is typo in my note above, I’ve misquoted the residual chlorite levels: they should be 0.3-0.5 ppm, not 3-5ppm. And the regulated maximum level of chlorite is 0.02 ppm, not 0.5 ppm.

          • Mona HB says:

            Great information, Sean. Thank you.

          • Sean Lumb says:

            I’ve updated my original post with additional information in relation to the use of a diffuser to spread out the heated cooling water and scrubbing of hypochlorite from cooling seawater. See below:

            Woodfibre LNG has indicated that it will require 17,000 metric tonnes of cooling water from Howe Sound each hour of operation to extract the heat from the natural gas liquefaction process. The cooling system is a once-through indirect system, which means seawater is sucked up and passed through a heat exchanger to extract the heat from a closed cooling loop connected to the liquefaction train. The heated water is then pumped back into Howe Sound. These facts have been provided by Woodfibre, Larry. This equates to 20 Brennan Park swimming pools’ worth of seawater each hour, or over 175,000 Brennan Park swimming pools’ worth of seawater each year. Brennan Park is Squamish’s local recreation centre and swimming pool.

            Woodfibre has also confirmed that the outfall temperature of the seawater returned to the ocean will be 10 Celsius higher than the ambient seawater temperature. Environmental regulations require that the temperature be no greater than 1 Celsius 100 metres from the outfall. This requirement says nothing of the temperature within the vicinity of the outfall, nor what happens to the micro- and macro fauna within that 100m radius. Woodfibre LNG has indicated that a special diffuser has been designed, which is a long pipe with holes in it. Woodfibre has indicated that emission of the heated seawater through diffuser will improve the local mixing of the warm water with the ambient seawater, and claims that the local temperature will return to near ambient (within 1 degree Celsius) within 10 m of the diffuser. Elevated seawater temperatures due to heated emissions for industrial plants can have a number of effects on the local environment, including eutrophication, during which microfauna blooms exhaust the oxygen supply in the water, reducing or killing the life-supporting water column. It’s not clear that Woodfibre LNG will be able to meet the 1C temperature requirement 100m from the outfall, and it’s not clear that they have assessed the thermodynamics of the heated water plume that will result from the cooling system outfall. If it is indeed clear and understood by Woodfibre LNG, then this information should be made publicly available to assuage the public’s concerns for the environmental effects of the heated outfall water.

            Woodfibre LNG has also confirmed that the seawater will be chlorinated as it is sucked up into the cooling system, to inhibit marine growth within the cooling system. This is often done electrochemically by using electricity to convert the natural salt (NaCl) in the seawater into sodium hypochlorite (NaClO, otherwise known as bleach). The use of this particular electrochemical generation technique has NOT been confirmed by Woodfibre LNG. Other chlorination options include injecting chlorine gas into the cooling water, but this involves the handling of dangerous chlorine gas. Hypochlorite is the same biocide that is used in municipal drinking water and swimming pools. Typical biocidal levels are 0.3-0.5 ppm total residual chlorine. The use of these levels in the cooling system proposed for Woodfibre LNG has not been confirmed by the proponent, however they are the levels typically used by municipalities to ensure the cleanliness of drinking water. Seawater cooling systems often use a pulsed chlorination technique to inhibit biofouling: this involves a timed periodic burst of chlorine over regular frequent intervals to prevent the growth of fouling marine organisms (e.g. molluscs and oysters). The use of this particular pulse technique at Woodfibre has not been confirmed by Woodfibre LNG.

            All emitters of total residual chlorine, which include municipalities and private companies or utilities, are required in BC to reduce residual chlorine emissions to below 0.02 ppm. This must be achieved chemically in some way: often with the addition of sulfite, thiosulfate, or other “chlorite scrubbing agents’. In the case of sulfite or thiosulfate, the products are salt (NaCl) and sulfate. Therefore, if the hypochlorite is reduced to 0.02 ppm from 0.5 ppm, there is still 0.43 ppm of extra sulfate being emitted in every 17,000 tonnes of heated chlorinated seawater, every hour. Sulfate naturally occurs in seawater, and minimum levels of sulfate are required to sustain sea life. It’s unclear the effect of elevated levels of sulfate in the local vicinity of the cooling water return diffuser.

            Further complicating the situation, hypochlorite in seawater rapidly reacts with natural bromide (Br-) in seawater to form hypobromite, and both of these chemical species react with dissolved organic compounds in seawater to form organic chlorides and organic bromides that are toxic to varying degrees to marine and land-based life.

            In addition to heat and chlorination, seawater in cooling systems is also often treated with other chemical agents designed to prevent chemical corrosion (as distinct from biofouling) and to condition the seawater. I have no information from Woodfibre LNG on these other conditioning agents.

    • Mona HB says:

      A majority of the LNG industry are members of Sigtto. This association dictates that an LNG facility should not be sited in a narrow, inland waterway with population centres along the shoreline with commercial & recreational marine traffic. Why? It is because LNG is referred to as a Class A Hazard requiring extreme caution. The 1000′ LNG Supertankers carry a highly volatile product. Yes, they have a good record but incidents do happen, especially at plants and when they do it is catastrophic. The shipping route passes through a waterway with ferries, barges, fish boats, other ships and a variety of recreational boats. Larry McLennan in his post appears to dismiss all the concerns that come from LNG engineers, chemistry PhD’s, Marine Biologists and geologists among others who have studied the Woodfibre proposal. He appears to place more belief in what, for example, Mr. Byng Giraud (VP of Corporate Affairs has to say). Certainly that is his right but keep in mind Mr. Giraud held the same position with Imperial Metals just before leaving to take his present job with Woodfibre LNG Ltd. It is his job to take the position of the proponent and he does it well. As for West Vancouver Council. Anyone can apply for delegation status. I have no idea if Woodfibre made such an application but Mr. Finn did and was happy to present his case as to why the Woodfibre proposal is wrong for Howe Sound on the basis of public safety, wrong for the environment and wrong for the regional economy. For example, Woodfibre LNG was invited along with BC Environmental Office to attend a panel discussion at the West Vancouver Library on July 8, 2014 but Woodfibre declined to attend. The members of West Vancouver Council are perfectly capable of doing their due diligence on this and any other topic. I applaud them along with Lions Bay, the Town of Gibsons, the Sunshine Coast Regional District and Islands Trust for also passing thoughtful resolutions requesting for a ban on LNG tankers in Howe Sound and along the shipping route in Georgia/Haro Straits. All those Municipalities and Regional Districts that supported a 2008 UBCM resolution presented by Powell River Regional District and passed with a majority vote, believe that their request to ban LNG tankers along the whole shipping route is still in effect.

      • Delena Angrignon says:

        Mona, thanks for your comments. I also want to add that it is John Weston’s own government who made the following statements below. Stephen Harper was very clear that LNG tankers in Canadian waters are not safe for the inhabitants. John Weston needs to be reminded of this as he carelessly defends Woodfibre LNG with not doing any research to the fact that their are international standards for LNG and waterways.
        Sept. 26, 2006: PM Stephen Harper addressing the House. Mr. Speaker, we have defended [the above] position for a long time. We oppose the passage of LNG tanker traffic through [Canadian waters] and we will continue to do so. (141 Hansard 53, 39th Parl. , 1st session)

        Feb 14, 2007: LNG tanker Policy : “passage of LNG tankers through the environmentally-sensitive and navigationally-challenging marine and coastal areas of sovereign Canadian waters … would present risks to the region … and its inhabitants that the Government of Canada cannot accept”. (Letter from Michael Wilson, Canadian Ambassador, to the U.S. Government)

    • Rob says:

      Larry: Look at the motive and conviction behind the speakers. It appears that John Weston unfortunately has little credibility and seems to only say what the ringmasters tell him to.

  10. tj says:

    John Weston for Prime Minister !!!!!
    Yah I hate that when Whistler tries grind our heads in the gravel with THEIR Gestapo boot heals. And that includes Vancouverites who use OUR area as THEIR personal playground on the weekends and then they skulk away back to their hovels. John you see, has what is called a heart, not a mechanical heart but an actual beating human heart. That..makes him ‘heartfelt’…. unlike the heartless ‘Earth Worshiping hippies ‘….

    • Adam says:

      Yes….send those visitors home. TJ’s right. We don’t need their millions of dollars. Those bloody tourists don’t even do anything to destroy the environment. I want more people in town with some real capacity to trash the place. Byng Giraud used to work for Imperial Metals…I’m hoping he can leverage some of the ‘tricks’ of the trade used at Mount Polley Mine to really screw Howe Sound up. I mean his new employer is one of the worst polluters in Indonesia and has been convicted of tax fraud. That’s what we need in Squamish!

  11. New from Mars says:

    tj: Are you for real…God help us!

  12. Donny says:

    Is John Weston that overrides my instructions to the Post Office not to put “stuffers” in my mail box? (something about Parliamentary priv.)

    Is LNG that outfit that phones me at 9.00 pm to ask my opinion..5 times ?

    Unacceptable risks, minimal job value , uncertain market risk , offshore ownership. …oh yummy , lets build two and get screwed twice.

  13. Conny M. says:

    As elected community representatives on the West Vancouver Council casting a unanimous vote, seems like the voices of constituents have been heard and have been acted upon. There may be a learning experience in this for provincial politicians to try out exercising their mandate of representing the wishes of their voters. Thank you West Van Council for listening to your community!!!

    • Mona HB says:

      Why not tell the West Vancouver Council. I bet they would love to hear from supporters. It is the exception rather than the rule that politicians at any level stand up as strongly as they did on this issue. Most just sit back and say nothing. You can send a group email to MayorandCouncil@WestVancouver.ca
      So glad to read your comment

      • Adam says:

        Amen! Would be great if Squamish Council could learn a thing or two about leadership from West Vancouver.

      • Jen says:

        Dear West Vancouver Council,

        A sincere and heart felt thank you for taking a decisive stance on opposing LNG in our area. Thank you for doing your research and listening to the people. You are the first hope I have had in government and democracy in a long time. Thank you for being political leaders, even if it meant sticking your necks out. We need more courageous folks like you in governance.

  14. Wendy says:

    Here is a youtube video about Woodfibre LNG done by Eoin Finn. He has spent the last 6 months educating both the public and politicians about Woodfibre LNG. Eoin is a physical chemist, has an MBA, and was a partner of KPMG, one of the world’s biggest audit and management advisory services. He knows his facts.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41QQyTWo_w0

    (If this youtube video doesn’t work, you can look it up on the web.)

    Woodfibre LNG, if built, will earn Canada/BC/Squamish very little money.
    Due to international tax agreements, and Woodfibre LNG being owned in Singapore, they won’t pay Federal taxes. In the big picture they will pay almost no BC taxes (due to the proposed very low tax rate on NET profits and the very high cost of LNG infrastucure, which will all be written off because the co is taxed on net profits). Municipally, the BC government is asking towns receiving LNG plants (including Kitimat) to charge lower than normal property taxes. And at a recent Squamish council meeting, Bruce Borwick, VP Commercial of Woodfibre LNG asked to pay $2 million property taxes/year, with a 2.5% increase/year, for 25 years (the length of their expected operations). $2 million/year was the rate paid by Woodfibre pulp mill in 2005, about 10 years ago (just before they shut down)! Certainly the Woodfibre land has increased in value in 10 years – $5 million might well be a more reasonable rate. Woodfibre LNG is owned overseas so ALL the profits will go overseas. 100 mostly highly skilled long term jobs are expected, and Canada is already doing the work to bring in temporary foreign workers for short term construction jobs. Speaking to Fortis (re new pipeline construction), they are quite open re not hiring folks from Squamish; Fortis already has its workers. We will be almost giving away our natural gas, for about 100 long term jobs. It doesn’t add up. I have no idea why the BC government wants this plant so desperately. John Weston should do some homework before he speaks.

  15. Wendy says:

    If you check John Weston’s voting record, I suspect you will see he uniformly votes with his party. A friend of mine asked Mr Weston if he had ever voted against the party. After some thought, he said yes, he had voted against the government once – re Canadian Olympic athletes wearing sealskin coats.

    • Adam says:

      A Harper Toadie. Doesn’t represent his constituents…votes the way Heir Harper tells him to. The reason he’s on the way out.

  16. Bob Manaton says:

    Do we really want to Frack the hell out of a earthquake fault line ??? we know the BC liberals are strapped for cash they have nothing left to sell . we know that the federal Conservatives just need money for their supporters . So i am glad that a municipality has the balls to stand up to them [ a conservative municipality no less ]

  17. New from Mars says:

    John is “Party whipped”!…. Plain and simple. What does he care…Follow the line and collect the Fat Pension at the end….but don’t rock the boat…..Such integrity!

    • tj says:

      ‘News from mars’…you are into whipping are you ? hmmmmm tsk tsk…such integrity…

  18. ben says:

    LNG is a cash grab, utilizing an old and thankfully closed industrial site that once poisoned and destroyed the Howe Sound (along with another industrial disaster, the Britannia mine). Bring mega fuel industry back to Squamish IS NOT in the community interests. Rather it’s because Squmaish municipality is BROKE and failed to capitalize on things like the Olympics, Ocean front development and resorts that it is being considered. It’s disgusting. As soon as whales start coming back they want to wreck it once again!! I never voted for Weston nor ever will.

  19. ben says:

    auto spell… oops

  20. Wendy says:

    Hurrah for the West Van mayor and council for having the courage to stand up to tremendous pressure from the provincial government re Woodfibre LNG. And I have emailed them re this, I sincerely hope others do. What a great day for democracy! I am very disappointed in John Weston.
    Laurie Parkinson, BSc, MSc
    Bowyer Island and North Vancouver

  21. Mark says:

    Thanks to the people for commenting and being part of are democracy.
    don’t! Let them tell you to wait till all the info is in, it is a tactic they use as it
    Is harder to stop the longer it moves along. Power to the people!

  22. Jaspera says:

    Thank you West Vancouver for having the gumption to vote against the proposed Wood Fibre LNG (WLNG) plant/terminal. Many daffodils to you for recognizing that this issue is not just about Squamish but about the whole Howe Sound ecosystem – water, air, soil, humans and biodiversity, good governance, and ultimately long-term, sustainable, clean development.

    Thank you to all the hard-working volunteers who have spent hundreds and hundreds of hours researching, analyzing, studying the issues around the WLNG, and making detailed presentations to municipalities, businesses and organizations in this magnificent Riding. And numerous DARTS to John Weston and his minions like Larry McLennan who do not undertake the same in-depth research and analysis, and who do not undertake any meaningful or eye-to-eye dialogue with those who have studied the issues and developed well-thought out analyses on the many multi-dimensional aspects of this proposed LNG project. John Weston has never once, except for his Olympic seal coats, stood up for the environment, anywhere, whether in BC or the rest of Canada. He totally toes the present Federal Government line, and now Christy Clarkès position, but never thinks for himself – his reaction to anything environmental is exactly that, reactionary. He has the gall of pointing accusatory fingers at opponents of WLNG, when he has done nothing but glad-hand, send out his expensive post-box wasters, smile expansively at ribbon-cutting ceremonies, and duck in-depth public meetings. He says wait for the inputs of experts. Does he even realize how many experts from many different disciplines are involved in preparing the research, studies, and analyses demonstrating clearly why this LNG project is NOT good for Squamish or the whole Howe Sound, down to West Vancouver. Does he not understand that, unlike him, those opposing the WLNG have a wider, bigger purview and understanding of what is at stake – they are not just looking at Squamish they are seeing a whole, huge, integrated eco-system being put (back) into danger. His comment about backyards shows his extreme limited vision and puerile understanding about how an interconnected, integrated, and inter-related eco-system actually works.

    Does he regard Byng Giraud, a very dubious proponent, and his team as the experts. Or Pacific Oil ad Gas which is linked to RGE based in Singapore which is linked to the Indonesian billionaire, Tanoto, who was asked to leave his own country due to tax evasion and had to pay a $250 million fine (apart from his expert environmental record of destroying huge swaths of rainforest). Are these the types of experts that Weston believes in or wants us to wait for. Did he ever attend one of the open houses orchestrated by the proponents – he might have seen what a farce and sham they were. Has he bothered to ascertain what is happening to peoples health, let alone marine and on-shore life, in jurisdictions outside of this Riding, this province, and even outside of Canada, for instance in the USA – where report after report is now coming in showing the health issues directly attributable to LNG projects. Why should Squamish and Howe Sound be any different from what is happening elsewhere. Should not we be adopting the Precautionary Principle, and even using common sense, which obviously is not very common these days among our various politicians. Therefore, once again, Thank You, to West Vancouver, and the other Howe Sound communities who are doing precisely that, in a way that neither our provincial or federal leaders are doing. Please donèt capitulate to the expostulations of John Weston or Christy Clark but continue to think about what will benefit the whole of this wonderful Howe Sound for the next 7 generations.

  23. Jonny says:

    “At this time, we have not heard of the Council investigating the matter thoroughly”

    Fixed this for you Mr Weston

    At this time, we have not heard of the *government* investigating the matter thoroughly

  24. Hal says:

    John the lap dog Weston is just doing what his master Steven Harper told him to do! Nothing more and nothing less, it doesn’t matter what his own opinion is because he will only do whats he told to do. And just to top it off he will get up in the house of commons and gleefully clap away at any lies Harper happens to be telling that day!

  25. Laurie Parkinson says:

    I have spent the Spring and Summer getting educated on LNG,
    and am impressed with the knowledge shown
    in all these comments. This isn’t the only anti-West
    Van mayor and council bravery article John Weston
    got published. There was also an article in last
    Friday’s North Shore News with the W Van mayor
    and much of the council feeling pretty nervous about
    the stance they took. It would be GREAT if you folks
    went to that site and supported the courage of these
    amazing politicians. Thanks, Laurie Parkinson
    Bowyer Island (in Howe Sound) and North Vancouver

  26. John says:

    What doesn’t surprise me is how West Van has always trumped the federal and provincial vote balance out of Squamish. Their population and long term support of conservative governments and policies have been glaringly apparent in overpowering any influence or concern Squamish might have. Mr Weston’s recent comments regarding West Van Council’s objection to LNG may be the turning point in his career. Unfortunately, he’s got his second term and the gold-plated pension that comes with it.

  27. The Vital Spark says:

    LNG is generally a very clean and extremely responsible industry but your concerns with WLNG should be their plan to use 2 elderly decommissioned LNG ships as their floating storage tanks. Cheap but similar US export projects are building brand new floating storage units and thus this points to corporate philosophy. Old is not necessarily bad but detailed assurance needs to be obtained that corners are not being cut. This project will only add temporary construction jobs with operational or maintenance jobs about 50 or less and with no significant economic input to the community.